All 50 States Ranked From Safest To Most Violent

Where does your state rank?
Harriet King May 8th 2018 Entertainment
To determine the most dangerous states in America, USA Today reviewed the 2017 violent crime rate for all 50 states with data from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. The violent crime rate consists of the number of murders, rapes, robberies, and aggravated assaults per 100,000 residents.
We never like to work ourselves up into a panic over nothing, but with high unemployment and poverty rates, it does get you wondering if you're going to be in danger in some areas. And that doesn't even include all of the other types of crime going on in the country.
The important thing to remember is to always stick to the facts and official statistics - don't let sensational news give you a warped impression. We've ranked all 50 states from safest to most violent so you don't have to do the work. The 5 most violent states are a bit surprising!
50. Vermont
Beautiful Vermont! It's no surprise that this simply gorgeous state is the safest in the country. When you stop to think about it, you realize that you barely ever hear any bad news from there. The towns are pretty sleepy and it's one of the smaller states, so it's not totally fair to be putting it up against something like New York, for example. But the stats don't lie! Move here if you want to be safe.
Vermont has a fairly low unemployment rate at only 3.1 percent, which isn't the lowest in the country (it's actually the ninth lowest), but it's still something to be proud of, especially with no large metropolitan areas to speak of. The most recent crime statistics reveal that Vermont has the lowest violent crime rate in the entire country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 118.0 per 100,000 (the lowest)
Murder rate: 1.6 per 100,000 (3rd lowest)
Median household income: $56,990 (20th highest)
Unemployment rate: 3.1% (9th lowest)
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49. Maine
Another picturesque state takes out a top spot in the safest places awards. As it turns out, Maine isn't just a pretty face - it totally lives up to its peaceful, seaside image. To put things into perspective, the national average when it came to violent crimes was 373 per 100,000 people. In Maine it was only 130, which is less than half! The state's incarceration rate is also less than half of the national average.
This could have something to do with the low unemployment rate of 3.2 percent. Studies show a correlation between low crime and high employment rates, so it seems like Maine definitely has the balance right. While incomes are actually at the lower end of the scale, this hasn't seemed to affect crime. Maybe it's a sign that money isn't everything?

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 130.1 per 100,000 (2nd lowest)
Murder rate: 1.7 per 100,000 (4th lowest)
Median household income: $51,494 (21st lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.2% (13th lowest)
48. New Hampshire
We're betting nobody expected New Hampshire to be dangerous, so it's not really a shock to see that this leafy state is the third safest in the country. When you adjust per capita, New Hampshire's crime stats are some of the most favorable nationwide. For example, in 2015 (the year these statistics were recorded), there were only 14 homicides in New Hampshire - the lowest in the country when adjusted to account for population.
In New Hampshire, 90 percent of crimes are financially motivated, which does tend to provide a sense of safety to residents. After all, it's much easier to get over someone stealing your wallet than some other types of violent crimes. New Hampshire's unemployment rate is extremely low at just 2.9 percent, meaning that even financially motivated crimes aren't terribly frequent anyway.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 199.3 per 100,000 (4th lowest)
Murder rate: 1.1 per 100,000 (the lowest)
Median household income: $70,303 (7th highest)
Unemployment rate: 2.9% (6th lowest)
47. Rhode Island
Here we have another state with a very low homicide rate compared to the national average. It seems like these quiet little states have discovered the secret to living a peaceful life: don't hurt each other and enjoy the great outdoors! Maybe there really is something about the seaside that keeps people calm. And when you think about it, have you ever been angry on a boat?
Just like Maine, Rhode Island's incarceration rate is less than half of the national average. Rhode Island doesn't have an extraordinarily low unemployment rate compared to others (4.1 percent), but it seems like the people there are doing just fine as they are. And though it has the 19th highest median household income, it's not exactly top of the list, so there's definitely more to this than money.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 242.5 per 100,000 (11th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.7 per 100,000 (12th lowest)
Median household income: $58,073 (19th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.1% (25th lowest)
46. Hawaii
Okay, this definitely gives our seaside theory some legitimacy. Hawaii has the second lowest murder rate in the entire country (after New Hampshire). And we have to think again that it's because it's difficult to be upset when you're by the ocean, or just in Hawaii in general. Imagine reclining back in a sun lounge and sipping on your favorite cocktail as you listen to the waves - pretty difficult to think about committing crimes, right?
Though violent crimes are low in Hawaii, property crimes, such as burglary and vehicle theft are more common. Based on the data, it's hard to guess why burglary is more of an issue, particularly given the fact that median household income is the second highest in the country and unemployment is the third lowest. Either way, we'd rather have our TV stolen than become a homicide statistic.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 293.4 per 100,000 (20th lowest)
Murder rate: 1.3 per 100,000 (2nd lowest)
Median household income: $73,486 (2nd highest)
Unemployment rate: 2.7% (3rd lowest)
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45. Minnesota
There's something about Minnesota that just makes us feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Maybe it's dreams of a lakeside cabin, walking through the woods, and getting a classic taste of the great outdoors. If it sounds that good to think about, maybe its residents think so too. Loving your beautiful state would probably be enough to stop you going on a murder spree.
In all seriousness, though, Minnesota can probably attribute its low crime rate to high rates of education attainment and low poverty. The unemployment rate is also relatively low at 3.7 percent, so it helps that the majority of Minnesota's people are earning a wage. The coolest thing about this very safe state is that even Minnesota's metropolitan areas, such as Saint Paul and Minneapolis, don't drive the crime stats up by much.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 242.6 per 100,000 (12th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.4 per 100,000 (9th lowest)
Median household income: $63,488 (12th highest)
Unemployment rate: 3.7% (17th lowest)
44. Utah
As it turns out, Utah has some pretty sensible laws when it comes to crime, which might be why it has a very low incarceration rate compared to the national average. In Utah, 391 out of every 100,000 people are incarcerated, whereas the national average is 607 per 100,000 people. This has a lot to do with their Justice Reinvestment Initiative, which saw certain non-violent felonies reclassified as misdemeanors.
While the murder rate sits at the fifth lowest in the country, Utah sadly has a lot of issues when it comes to violence against women. When it comes to rape and domestic violence, Utah's rate is higher than the national average, which is more than a little alarming. Law enforcement in Utah is also less likely to process rape kits than police officers in other states.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 236.0 per 100,000 (9th lowest)
Murder rate: 1.8 per 100,000 (5th lowest)
Median household income: $62,912 (13th highest)
Unemployment rate: 3.2% (13th lowest)
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43. Massachusetts
You wouldn't think that a state famous for its harassment and assault of women in the form of the Salem Witch Trials would have been able to clean up its image so well. But it totally has and everybody loves it here now! In fact, it has the sixth lowest murder rate in the country, so they've definitely done away with that whole "witch" burning thing. We hear there's even some wonderful tourist attractions out that way now.
In terms of modern-day crime rate, Massachusetts is a great role model for the rest of the USA. Though incidents of murder are low in this state, other violent crimes do take place at a rate higher than the national average. Median average household incomes are high at $70,628, but the unemployment rate is on the high side at 4.2 percent.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 390.9 per 100,000 (18th highest)
Murder rate: 1.9 per 100,000 (6th lowest)
Median household income: $70,628 (6th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.2% (23rd highest)
42. Connecticut
We're not going to make any crazy assumptions here, but it's definitely worth noting that the state of Connecticut has the fifth highest median household income in the country. Sitting nicely at $71,346, it's certainly something to consider when you ponder the state's very low crime rates. Only 10.5 percent of the population lives in poverty, which is the sixth lowest in the USA.
Connecticut has also been doing really well on the imprisonment front and is currently at its lowest incarceration rate in more than twenty years. Puzzlingly, unemployment rates are some of the worst in the country at 4.9 percent, which is the seventh highest. Does this count all of the wealthy people who just chill out in their big houses all day? We'd like to think that they're listed as officially 'unemployed'.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 218.5 per 100,000 (6th lowest)
Murder rate: 3.3 per 100,000 (17th lowest)
Median household income: $71,346 (5th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.9% (7th highest)
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41. New Jersey
Here we have the final state that made it into the top ten. Most people probably wouldn't have expected to see New Jersey up the top of this list, but given the high median household income of $72,222 (the fourth highest in the country), we guess everyone is probably too busy working to care about going on violent killing sprees.
In terms of serious violent crimes, such as robbery, murder, and rape, New Jersey is well below the national average and is considered extremely safe. With such close proximity to New York, which has a much higher crime rate, we think New Jersey residents kind of get the best of both worlds. The unemployment rate in New Jersey sits exactly in the middle of all 50 states (4.1 percent), but it hasn't stopped it from reaching the top ten.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 255.4 per 100,000 (13th lowest)
Murder rate: 4.1 per 100,000 (22nd lowest)
Median household income: $72,222 (4th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.1% (25th lowest)
40. Iowa
Welcome to super safe Iowa, where the murder rate is the eighth lowest in the country. We're sure the information that you're unlikely to be murdered here comforts a lot of Iowans and visitors to the state! Though the murder rate is one of the lowest in the country, the violent crime rate is only the 18th lowest at 286.1 per 100,000 people. Despite all this, they're still doing pretty well.
The thriving Iowan economy might be the reason why they've managed to escape higher crime rates. Built off the back of the agriculture industry (which is still very active today), Iowa is now a manufacturing hot spot with the ninth lowest unemployment rate in the USA. A lot of these statistics reveal a link between employment and crime, and it's probably why Iowa is so safe.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 286.1 per 100,000 (18th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.3 per 100,000 (8th lowest)
Median household income: $54,736 (25th highest)
Unemployment rate: 3.1% (9th lowest)
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39. North Dakota
Wow, North Dakota is certainly impressive when it comes to unemployment rate. It's sitting at 2.5 percent, making it the second lowest in the entire country. We definitely wouldn't have picked it! But relatively recent oil activity has definitely boosted the amount of jobs overall. As we've seen previously, lots of jobs generally means a lot less violence.
However, North Dakota is far from perfect. In fact, the rise in job availability and incomes has even led to higher rates of property crime, such as burglary and vehicle theft. Instances of drug use and addiction are also on the rise. Though North Dakota's murder rate is the 13th lowest in the country, it has recently recorded its highest number of annual homicides (21) since 1993. We won't bring it down any further - all in all North Dakota is doing pretty good!

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 239.4 per 100,000 (10th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.8 per 100,000 (13th lowest)
Median household income: $60,557 (16th highest)
Unemployment rate: 2.5% (2nd lowest)
38. Washington
We always imagined it would be so peaceful up in Washington. Maybe because of all the greenery and nature trails, or maybe because of its proximity to Canada. We're not totally sure where the idea came from, but it definitely seems to hold true, as Washington sits pretty high on this list. This is especially impressive given the large metropolitan area of Seattle.
The high median household income certainly wouldn't be harming the peace up there - it's the tenth highest in the country. Washington also has high rates of education attainment, with 34 percent of adults holding a bachelors degree and 91 percent holding at least a high school diploma. Education attainment is positively linked to low crime rates in countries and cities all over the world, so they're definitely doing something right!

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 284.4 per 100,000 (17th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.9 per 100,000 (14th lowest)
Median household income: $64,129 (10th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.5% (17th highest)
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37. Oregon
Another state famous for its stunning nature makes it on the safer end of this list. To be honest, everyone in Oregon is probably way too busy hiking and enjoying the fresh air to worry about committing violent crimes. While this leafy state sits at number 14 for overall safety, Oregon makes it into the top ten for its low murder rate of only 2.5 per 100,000 people per year. We've got to say, we love a good low murder rate.
Like its upstairs neighbor, Washington, education attainment rates are high in Oregon, with 32 percent of the population holding a bachelor's degree. Around 90 percent of the population holds at least a high school diploma, which is above the national average of 87 percent. Unemployment rates in Oregon are also some of the best in the country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 259.8 per 100,000 (14th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.5 per 100,000 (10th lowest)
Median household income: $54,148 (25th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.6% (15th lowest)
36. New York
We were really shocked when we saw that New York was one of the safest states in the USA. Given that it is home to the most populous city in the States, we kind of thought bad stuff would be going on all the time. New York City itself has a higher than average crime rate, which is not unusual for a city of more than eight million people, but the rest of the state is pretty normal when it comes to crime.
New York has really been working on reducing its incarceration rate, and it seems to be paying off. State reforms have seen previous non-violent felony charges be downgraded to misdemeanors, which has seen the prison population decline significantly. The median household income is lower than you might think, at $60,850, which could mean a lot more people in poverty in the city.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 379.7 per 100,000 (23rd highest)
Murder rate: 3.1 per 100,000 (15th lowest)
Median household income: $60,850 (15th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.4% (20th highest)
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35. Idaho
Idaho might be number 16 on this list, but we would like to point out that its murder rate is very low. At 1.9 per 100,000 people per year, it's the seventh lowest in the entire country. So, well done to Idaho! And unlike some other states, it also has an extremely low rate of other violent crimes such as robbery, rape and sexual assault, and grievous bodily harm - at 215.6 per 100,000 people, it's the fifth lowest in the country.
The median household income in Idaho is the 11th lowest in the USA at $48,275. And though we often see a correlation between low household income and crime, it hasn't seemed to affect this peaceful state. This could have something to do with the fact that the unemployment rate is 3.2 percent, which is the 13th lowest in the country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 215.6 per 100,000 (5th lowest)
Murder rate: 1.9 per 100,000 (7th lowest)
Median household income: $48,275 (11th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.2% (13th lowest)
34. Nebraska
We've said it before and we'll say it again - when people have jobs there's significantly less crime to report. In Nebraska's case, they boast one of the lowest unemployment rates in the whole country. Only 2.9 percent of the population doesn't have a job, which is the sixth lowest in the United States. The amount of people living in poverty is also below the national average.
The violent crime rate in Nebraska is relatively low at only 274 per 100,000 people, compared to the national average of 373 per 100,000 people. It's actually the 15th lowest in the country, even though Nebraska sits at number 17 on this list. We guess that all of the agriculture work must keep people super busy! There is definitely a lot of corn to take care of over there.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 274.9 per 100,000 (15th lowest)
Murder rate: 3.3 per 100,000 (18th lowest)
Median household income: $54,996 (24th highest)
Unemployment rate: 2.9% (6th lowest)
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33. Wyoming
The people of Wyoming certainly have a lot to be proud of when it comes to crime. The violent crime rate in Wyoming is significantly lower than the national average of 373 per 100,000 people per year. In Wyoming it's only 222 per 100,000 people per year, which is the eighth lowest in the country. It's not just murders we're looking at here either. The rate of reported rapes and other forms of sexual assault is also low, as well as robbery.
When it comes to murder specifically, Wyoming is also on the low end of the scale at 2.7 per 100,000 people - the 11th lowest in the USA. Though fewer people die from murder here than in your average state, Wyoming has an unusually high suicide rate in comparison. It's the third highest in the country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 222.1 per 100,000 (8th lowest)
Murder rate: 2.7 per 100,000 (11th lowest)
Median household income: $60,214 (17th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.1% (25th lowest)
32. Colorado
Here's another state favored by nature lovers all over the world. But this one is not ranked as high as some of the others. Colorado's safety is kind of brought down a little by the metropolitan area of Pueblo, where there is some gang violence that alters the statistics. In general, Colorado is a very safe state and perfect for hiking and ski trips!
Colorado has the lowest unemployment rate in the country at 2.3 percent, so most people have jobs to keep them busy and to keep a roof over their heads, which is wonderful. Education attainment is also high, with almost 40 percent of the population holding a bachelor's degree. We think the people of Colorado have proven how much good education and plenty of jobs can create a happy and peaceful state.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 321.0 per 100,000 (23rd lowest)
Murder rate: 3.2 per 100,000 (16th lowest)
Median household income: $63,909 (11th highest)
Unemployment rate: 2.3% (the lowest)
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31. Virginia
Virginia definitely has a lot to be proud of. With a violent crime rate of 195 per 100,000 people per year, it's the third lowest in the country. Median household salaries are the eighth highest in the USA, which, as we've seen, often correlates with low violence. However, high salaries may partially be skewed due to the state being home to the nation's capital, Washington D.C.
Education attainment is high in Virginia, with 37 percent of the population holding bachelor's degrees. We can hear you wondering why Virginia isn't way further up in this list. We thought the same. But as it turns out, the incarceration rate is high. The murder rate is also the 24th highest in the country. Despite the last two snippets of information, Virginia can still be considered a relatively safe state to visit.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 195.6 per 100,000 (3rd lowest)
Murder rate: 4.6 per 100,000 (24th highest)
Median household income: $66,262 (8th highest)
Unemployment rate: 3.8% (18th lowest)
30. Wisconsin
Home of cheese curds, lush nature and lakes, and many, many craft breweries, life in Wisconsin tends to be pretty laid back for residents. There's definitely less than the average amount of violence to worry about. There are around 306 violent crimes per 100,000 people per year in Wisconsin, whereas the national average is 373 per 100,000 people per year.
Most of Wisconsin's cities are extremely safe. The only area driving up violence is the Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis metropolitan area. In fact, it's one of the most dangerous cities in the USA. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin is the ninth lowest in the country at 3.1 percent, which could explain why most of the state is so safe. Unfortunately, incarceration rate is high in Wisconsin and 606 of every 100,000 people are living in state prisons.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 305.8 per 100,000 (21st lowest)
Murder rate: 4.2 per 100,000 (23rd lowest)
Median household income: $55,638 (23rd highest)
Unemployment rate: 3.1% (9th lowest)
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29. Ohio
While Ohio isn't a particularly violent state in general, its cities really increase the rate of violence. The city of Toledo has a violent crimes rate of 1,129 per 100,000 people per year. The national average is 373 per 100,000 people per year, so you can see how much more dangerous certain cities are! About 90 percent of violent crimes in Ohio take place in metropolitan areas - outside of this, crime rates are relatively low.
The entire state has a violent crime rate of 292 per 100,000 people, which is actually less than the national average, so it's not all bad in Ohio. One of the more concerning things about Ohio, however, is its high unemployment rate. At 4.9 percent, it's much higher than the national average and could be a factor in why the cities have such high instances of violence.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 291.9 per 100,000 (19th lowest)
Murder rate: 4.3 per 100,000 (24th lowest)
Median household income: $51,075 (17th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.9% (7th highest)
28. Montana
As a state, Montana does really well when it comes to education. About 94 percent of the population has graduated from high school, which usually correlates with lower levels of violence. All of that education could have something to do with Montana's relatively low unemployment rate. At 3.9 percent, it's the 20th lowest in the country. And as we've seen, when people have jobs, there tends to be less crime.
In terms of violent crime rate, Montana sits fairly close to the national average, at 350 per 100,000 people per year. The national average is 373 per 100,000 people per year, so Montana is definitely a middle of the range kind of state. Though its education stats are good, median household income is fairly low in Montana. In fact, it's the 14th lowest in the country at $49,000.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 349.6 per 100,000 (25th highest)
Murder rate: 3.5 per 100,000 (19th lowest)
Median household income: $49,509 (14th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.9% (20th lowest)
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27. West Virginia
When it comes to crime, West Virginia generally sits at the middle of the road when compared on a national scale. Violent crime rate is the 24th lowest in the country, while the murder rate is the 21st lowest. If we take a look at property crime, West Virginia is again below the national average. It's not great, but it's not bad either.
However, the statistics above don't really line up with the suicide rate in West Virginia, which is the 11th highest in the USA at 19.5 per 100,000 people. With economic woes a key contributor to death by suicide, this does seem to correlate with the rest of West Virginia's statistics. Median household income is the third lowest in the country at $42,000, while the unemployment rate is the 17th highest at 4.5 percent.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 337.9 per 100,000 (24th lowest)
Murder rate: 3.8 per 100,000 (21st lowest)
Median household income: $42,019 (3rd lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.5% (17th highest
26. South Dakota
Sitting halfway down the list at number 25, South Dakota is fairly middle of the range when it comes to crime statistics. The violent crime rate is just slightly above the national average; however, the murder rate is below the average. It is mostly aggravated assault driving the violent crime statistics up, as opposed to homicides. All things being considered, we'd say good work with the fewer than average murders, South Dakota!
Unfortunately for the majority female victims, rape occurs at a higher than normal rate in South Dakota. In fact, it has the seventh highest rate of rapes, at 58 people per 100,000 people per year. There are some good things about the state that do deserve a mention, though. For example, it has the sixth lowest unemployment rate in the entire country, at 2.9 percent.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 383.1 per 100,000 (22nd highest)
Murder rate: 3.7 per 100,000 (20th lowest)
Median household income: $53,017 (23rd lowest)
Unemployment rate:2.9% (6th lowest)
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25. California
Our 'less crime happens by the ocean' theory might be a little shaky now that we've reached California. The stereotype is chilled out surfers, gorgeous beaches, and pretty great weather all year round, so it's not unreasonable to think that it might be fairly safe. And it is definitely not a 'dangerous' state to visit, but it's just not as innocent as you may have originally thought.
The violent crime rate is well above the national average and is the 13th highest in the country. But to be fair to California, 98 percent of these crimes take place in major metropolitan areas. While the rate of murders, rapes, assaults, and robberies is above average, suicide in California is uncommon and is the seventh lowest in the country. Must be all of that time in the sun!

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 426.3 per 100,000 (13th highest)
Murder rate: 4.8 per 100,000 (22nd highest)
Median household income: $64,500 (9th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.7% (13th highest)
24. Illinois
Home to the city of Chicago, nobody could blame you for assuming Illinois might be a little more violent than position 24 on this list. It seems like all we ever hear about on the news is violence in Chicago, so it makes sense to think that Illinois could be the most dangerous state of them all. This isn't actually true, though - this misunderstood state is pretty much in line with national averages when it comes to crime.
The murder rate in Illinois is definitely higher than most, sitting at 14th highest in the country. This is partially due to gang violence in metropolitan areas. However, with all other statistics considered, Illinois is generally not a dangerous state to visit or live in. Avoid areas that are known to be rife with gang violence and all should be fine!

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 383.8 per 100,000 (21st highest)
Murder rate: 5.8 per 100,000 (14th highest)
Median household income: $59,588 (18th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.6% (16th highest)
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23. North Carolina
As the state with the tenth lowest median household income, you wouldn't exactly expect a crime-free environment (low salaries and crime often go hand in hand). However, North Carolina doesn't score too badly on the statistics front. Most elements are pretty much in line with the national averages. Homicide is slightly higher than middle range, though, and is the 18th highest in the country.
Perhaps a sign that there's a bit of crime to fight over in North Carolina is the volume of police on the streets. It's the sixth largest police force in the United States, with 341 officers to every 100,000 residents. In terms of violent crime in general, North Carolina ranks 25th - exactly halfway through the list. Unemployment rates are a little high, sitting at around 4.5 percent, which is the 17th highest in the country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 347.0 per 100,000 (25th lowest)
Murder rate: 5.1 per 100,000 (18th highest)
Median household income: $47,830 (10th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.5% (17th highest)
22. Kentucky
Kentucky is what people think of when they imagine southern charm, hunting, and fishing. It also has a bit of a hillbilly stereotype attached to it, but we won't go too far into that one! Given its position at number 29 on this list you'd probably be surprised to learn that the violent crime rate in Kentucky is one of the lowest in the country. The seventh lowest, in fact. For every 100,000 people, there were 219 violent crimes annually - way below the national average of 373.
One of the reasons it is on the more violent side of this list is because of the high incarceration rate. It has the ninth highest incarceration rate in the USA, with 760 people per 100,000 living in state prisons. In addition to this, the unemployment rate in Kentucky is the fifth highest in the country at 5 percent.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 218.7 per 100,000 (7th lowest)
Murder rate: 4.7 per 100,000 (23rd highest)
Median household income: $45,215 (5th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 5.0% (5th highest)
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21. Kansas
As far as Kansas goes, it's probably got the most average violent crime statistics of all the states. In fact, it comes in 25th place for murder rate, so you can't get much more average than that. The violent crime rate is slightly higher, though, at 389.9 per 100,000 people, making it the 19th highest in the USA. Kansas is also on the high end for suicide rate - it's the 15th highest in the country at 17.9 per 100,000 people.
Economic factors are pretty much in line with the crime rates in Kansas. For example, the median household income is very middle of the range compared to the other states - it's the 24th lowest in the country at $53,906. Unemployment rate ranks a little better at 3.7 percent, which is the 17th lowest in the USA.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 389.9 per 100,000 (19th highest)
Murder rate: 4.4 per 100,000 (25th lowest)
Median household income: $53,906 (24th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.7% (17th lowest)
20. Pennsylvania
At your first glance of the statistics, Pennsylvania seems fairly peaceful. With slightly lower rates of violent crime than the national average, you'd be thinking "what's the problem over there?" It's not so much that Pennsylvania is 'dangerous' but it does have a higher than average incarceration rate, with 655 people imprisoned for every 100,000 people (the national average is 607).
The murder rate is also slightly higher than average, though not by much. In Pennsylvania, 5.1 people for every 100,000 people are murdered, whereas the national average is 4.9 people. Pennsylvania also has one of the highest unemployment rates in the entire country at 5 percent. It's the fifth highest, to be exact. Based on similar sets of statistics, this can often correlate with higher crime rates, which seems to be the case here.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 315.1 per 100,000 (22nd lowest)
Murder rate: 5.1 per 100,000 (19th highest)
Median household income: $55,702 (21st highest)
Unemployment rate:5.0% (5th highest)
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19. Michigan
Michigan is certainly a mixed bag when it comes to crime and the overall stats don't always reveal the full story. Metropolitan areas bump Michigan up to 15th highest murder rate and 15th highest violent crime rate, but most non-city areas experience little violence. All round, the violent crime rate here is 416 incidents per 100,000 people per year, which isn't ridiculously higher than the national average of 373.
However, when you look at specific cities, the crime rates skyrocket. In Flint the violent crime rate is 580 incidents per 100,000 people, and in Saginaw it's 606. If you thought that was bad, wait until you hear about Detroit. It's the second highest violent crime rate for a US city and it's 1,760 incidents per 100,000 people. We probably won't be visiting any time soon!

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 415.5 per 100,000 (15th highest)
Murder rate: 5.8 per 100,000 (15th highest)
Median household income: $51,084 (18th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.2% (23rd highest)
18. Indiana
While Indiana as a whole enjoys a relatively low unemployment rate of 3.2 percent (13th lowest in the country), there are still a lot of problems when it comes to violent crime. The capital, Indianapolis, is one of the most dangerous cities in the US with a violent crime rate of 675 incidents per 100,000 people. The state average is much lower at 387.5 per 100,000 people, but it's still the 20th highest in the country.
Murder rate is even worse at 5.6 per 100,000 people, making it the 16th highest in the USA. Though crime rates can often be linked to low income and high unemployment, it simply isn't the case for unemployment rates in Indiana. However, the median household income is comparatively low. At $50,532 it's the 16th lowest in the whole country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 387.5 per 100,000 (20th highest)
Murder rate: 5.6 per 100,000 (16th highest)
Median household income: $50,532 (16th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.2% (13th lowest)
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17. Arizona
When most people think of Arizona, they immediately conjure up images of the Grand Canyon, cactus-filled deserts, and the flowing Colorado River in their minds. What most people don't realize is that it's not exactly the most peaceful state in the country, despite all of the wide-open space and surrounding nature.
Arizona's violent crime rate is above average, at 410 incidents per 100,000 residents. It also has one of the highest incarceration rates in the United States. Around 800 people per 100,000 people live in state prisons. Arizona also has one of the largest police forces in the country. While that doesn't always mean there's more crime to fight, it's certainly a good sign. Unemployment rates are the fourth highest in the US at 5.1 percent, which could contribute to the higher than average crime rates.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 410.2 per 100,000 (17th highest)
Murder rate: 4.5 per 100,000 (25th highest)
Median household income: $51,492 (20th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 5.1% (4th highest)
16. Texas
We've got to be honest, we really thought Texas would be a little more violent than this. At number 16, it's not exactly in the best position on this list, but we were betting on it being up there in the top five. We're sure we're not the only ones imagining a 'no rules' environment and cowboy-related violence over here!
Though you might be surprised at Texas's statistics compared to other states, it's still nothing to celebrate when it comes to crime. At 412.2 per 100,000 people, Texas has the 16th highest violent crime rate in the country. The murder rate is not much better at 4.8 per 100,000 people, which is the 21st highest in the USA. Though unemployment is the 12th highest at 4.8 percent, median household incomes are the 22nd highest at $55,653.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 412.2 per 100,000 (16th highest)
Murder rate: 4.8 per 100,000 (21st highest)
Median household income: $55,653 (22nd highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.8% (12th highest)
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15. Florida
Many of us picture silver-haired retirees, cocktails by the pool, and beautiful beaches when we think of Florida. But like so many places, there's a bit of an underbelly that you don't necessarily see in the tourist brochures. Florida boasts the 11th highest violent crime rate in the country. For every 100,000 residents, 462 violent incidents occur per year. This is much higher than the national average of 373 incidents.
As with most states, metropolitan areas push up the stats significantly, and in the case of Florida, tourists aren't getting murdered while they're on a beach vacation. The Tallahassee area certainly does its share when it comes to crime - there are 769 violent incidents per 100,000 residents, which is more than double the national average. Florida also has a high incarceration rate, with 755 people living in state prisons for every 100,000 residents.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 461.9 per 100,000 (11th highest)
Murder rate: 5.1 per 100,000 (20th highest)
Median household income: $49,426 (13th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.3% (21st highest)
14. Maryland
Maryland is another state where major cities drive up the crime rate. In this case, the state's largest city, Baltimore, is the culprit. In 2015 there were 8.6 homicides per 100,000 people in Maryland, making it the highest murder rate in the whole country. To be fair, there were riots that year, which definitely increased this rate a little more than what it would usually be.
Being close to the nation's capital, it's not super surprising that Maryland records the highest median household earnings at $75,847. However, you don't usually see a high violent crime rate along with those kinds of salaries. In addition to high salaries, the unemployment rate isn't particularly high. It's the 23rd highest in the country at 4.2 percent, but that isn't enough to be in line with the high crime rates.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 457.2 per 100,000 (12th highest)
Murder rate: 8.6 per 100,000 (3rd highest)
Median household income: $75,847 (the highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.2% (23rd highest)
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13. Georgia
The state of Georgia certainly has a rich history of violence that spans centuries. As one of the original Confederate states, it's not totally shocking that violence still continues down here today. Horrific histories can be hard to shake, and tensions often remain high even centuries after the events are put to rest. In Georgia's case, it puts them at number 13 on the list.
Incarceration rates in Georgia are the fifth highest in the USA, with 866 people per 100,000 residents living in state prisons. In addition to this, Georgia's unemployment rate is the seventh highest in the country at 4.9 percent. Though violent crime is "only" 24th highest and middle of the range, the murder rate is the 12th highest in the country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 378.3 per 100,000 (24th highest)
Murder rate: 6.0 per 100,000 (12th highest)
Median household income: $51,244 (19th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.9% (7th highest)
12. Delaware
The bad news about Delaware is that it suffers from a high rate of violent crime (as you might expect from the 12th most dangerous state in the USA). Overall, Delaware comes in eighth for murder rate, as well as violent crime rate, which includes murder, rape, assault, and robbery. Despite having the 14th highest median household income at $61,255, it hasn't seemed to spark a positive effect on crime rates in Delaware.
In addition to Delaware's concerning violence issues, the state has extremely high incarceration rates. For every 100,000 residents, 708 people are housed in state prisons. A large prison population like this usually indicates a high level of violence in the state. We don't know exactly what went wrong in Delaware, but we hope they figure out their issues and fix them soon!

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 499.0 per 100,000 (8th highest)
Murder rate: 6.7 per 100,000 (8th highest)
Median household income: $61,255 (14th highest)
Unemployment rate: 4.7% (13th highest)
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11. Arkansas
With the second lowest median household income in the whole country, it's not really a huge surprise that Arkansas has an issue with violent crime. We've seen time and time again that low incomes tend to correlate with higher rates of violence. In the case of Arkansas, it has the sixth highest violent crime rate in the country, at 521 incidents per 100,000 people. With the national average sitting at 373 incidents, this is well above the norm.
When it comes to the most serious crime of all: murder, Arkansas ranks 11th highest in the country. In addition to this, about 19 percent of Arkansas's population lives in poverty. High levels of poverty also tend to correlate with violence, so this is also not a huge surprise, when you consider the crime rate in this state.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 521.3 per 100,000 (6th highest)
Murder rate: 6.1 per 100,000 (11th highest)
Median household income: $41,995 (2nd lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.4% (14th lowest)
10. Oklahoma
Okay everyone, we've officially made it to the top ten most violent states in the USA. First up is Oklahoma, which we weren't really expecting if we're being honest. This state kind of just flies under the radar and most people probably don't associate it with violent crime. When we think of Oklahoma, we mostly just think of cowboys, tornadoes, open plains, and windmills, as opposed to high murder rates.
The murder rate here is the 13th highest in the country, with 6 homicides taking place for every 100,000 residents. Oklahoma also has the second highest prison population in the USA, with around 1,015 inmates per 100,000 residents. The metropolitan areas of Lawton, Tulsa, and Oklahoma City really drive up the crime rates, as we've seen happen in other states, too. In Lawton there were 747 violent crimes per 100,000 people.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 422.0 per 100,000 (14th highest)
Murder rate: 6.0 per 100,000 (13th highest)
Median household income: $48,568 (12th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.3% (21st highest)
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9. Mississippi
There are definitely a lot of things going on in this very complicated southern state. First of all, Mississippi has the lowest median household income in the whole country, which always seems to be a recipe for disaster when it comes to crime. The murder rate is the second highest in the country, with 8.7 homicides taking place per 100,000 people.
Surprisingly, given the extremely high murder rate, the overall violent crime rate is low. For every 100,000 residents, there are 276 incidents, which is actually almost 100 less than the national average. So, well done, we guess? About 22 percent of Mississippi's population lives in poverty, which is the highest percentage in the country. The rate of suicides carried out with guns is also the highest at about 70 percent. Like we said, there's a lot going on here.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 275.8 per 100,000 (16th lowest)
Murder rate: 8.7 per 100,000 (2nd highest)
Median household income: $40,593 (the lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.9% (7th highest)
8. New Mexico
As we've seen with some of the other states on this list, low wages and high unemployment rates tend to go hand in hand with violent crime. In the case of New Mexico, its population suffers with the second highest unemployment rate in the country, at 6.6 percent. Due to a lack of jobs and low median household incomes (sixth lowest in the USA at $45,382), about 20 percent of the state lives in poverty.
New Mexico has the third highest violent crime rate in the country. For every 100,000 residents, there were 656 violent incidents, which is much higher than the national average of 373 incidents. The murder rate in New Mexico is significantly lower in comparison, but certainly nothing to celebrate. At 5.6 per 100,000 people, it's the 17th highest in the country.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 656.1 per 100,000 (3rd highest)
Murder rate: 5.6 per 100,000 (17th highest)
Median household income: $45,382 (6th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 6.6% (2nd highest)
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7. South Carolina
Most are familiar with South Carolina because of its stunning coastline, but it definitely has a more sinister side that you might not know anything about. In this list we have frequently seen some more chilled out crime rates where the land meets the sea, however, in the case of South Carolina, it certainly isn't so.
The violent crime rate in South Carolina is the seventh highest in the USA and the murder rate is the fifth highest, making it one of the country's least peaceful states. Salaries aren't the best and are the eighth lowest in the country at $47,238. Funnily enough, at 4.1 percent, the unemployment rate isn't bad and sits in the middle of the road in 25th place. We're not sure what makes the murder rate so high, but we sure hope everyone decides to start spending more time at the beach instead.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 504.5 per 100,000 (7th highest)
Murder rate: 8.1 per 100,000 (5th highest)
Median household income: $47,238 (8th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.1% (25th lowest)
6. Missouri
Famous for the Ozark Mountains, jazz and blues, delicious barbecues, and perfectly brewed beer, Missouri is one of those states that simply doesn't seem threatening when you think about it. Unfortunately, the violent crime statistics tell a completely different story. Coming in at the 15th lowest for median household income and 20th lowest for unemployment, these statistics are somewhat unremarkable. It's the violence in Missouri that has earned it 6th place on this list.
As we've seen with many of the states, the violence in a particular city or cities can drive up the crime rate. In the case of Missouri, it's St. Louis, which is technically the most violent city in the USA. With a rate of 1,817 violent crimes per 100,000 residents, it's no wonder Missouri as a whole looks kind of dangerous on paper.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 497.4 per 100,000 (9th highest)
Murder rate: 8.3 per 100,000 (4th highest)
Median household income: $50,238 (15th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 3.9% (20th lowest)
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5. Tennessee
Here we were thinking of Tennessee as the peaceful home of country music, when in reality it's the fifth most violent state in the USA. Who would have thought? Definitely not us! Like many of the more violent states in the country, there is a correlation with low median household income (9th lowest in the country), but that's not the only thing to take note of in Tennessee. Aggravated assault takes place here at a higher rate than most other states. For every 100,000 residents, about 452 instances of aggravated assault take place.
The overall violent crime rate in Tennessee is the fourth highest in the country at 612 incidents per 100,000 residents. The murder rate is high, but surprisingly only tenth highest, at 6.2 homicides per 100,000 residents. The area driving up most of these statistics is the metropolitan area of Memphis, as opposed to the state's capital of Nashville.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 612.1 per 100,000 (4th highest)
Murder rate: 6.2 per 100,000 (10th highest)
Median household income: $47,275 (9th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.0% (21st lowest)
4. Nevada
As the ninth least densely populated state in the USA, it's hard to imagine Nevada as the fourth most violent state in the country. All we really think about is the vast and empty desert. Of course, it does start to make a whole lot of sense when you think about all the trouble that goes on in Las Vegas. There's a reason the saying exists, and it's because things that aren't meant to happen definitely end up happening there.
Nevada has the second highest violent crime rate in the country, at 696 incidents per 100,000 people. The population also has a relatively low rate of education attainment, with only 23 percent of people holding a bachelor's degree (the national average is 31 percent). The bulk of crime, 97 percent, to be exact, takes place in the state's metropolitan areas.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 695.9 per 100,000 (2nd highest)
Murder rate: 6.2 per 100,000 (9th highest)
Median household income: $52,431 (22nd lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.7% (13th highest)
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3. Alabama
Fans of Lynyrd Skynyrd probably automatically start singing the lyrics to "Sweet Home Alabama" when they think of this iconic state. But in terms of violent crime, it's really anything but sweet. One of the main indicators of violence in the state is its extremely high prison population. In Alabama there are 883 inmates for every 100,000 residents, which is the fourth highest incarceration rate in the country.
The murder rate in Alabama is the 7th highest in the country at 7.2 per 100,000 people. Combine this with the 10th highest violent crime rate in the USA and you've got yourself a recipe for disaster. People tend to do it tough here - median household income is $44,765, which is the 4th lowest in the country, while the unemployment rate is the 7th highest at 4.9 percent.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 472.4 per 100,000 (10th highest)
Murder rate: 7.2 per 100,000 (7th highest)
Median household income: $44,765 (4th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 4.9% (7th highest)
2. Alaska
Well, we certainly weren't expecting the most sparsely populated state in the country to be one of the most violent! All we think about when we imagine Alaska is salmon, bears, and lots and lots of snow. We never would have thought of it as the state with the highest rate of violent crime in the USA. We thought everyone up there was living a peaceful life in the great outdoors. It really shows that you can't assume anything.
When you consider the violent crime rate of 730 incidents per 100,000 residents, it's absolutely staggering. Alaska also has the highest rate of rape and aggravated assault in the United States. The unemployment rate is the highest in the country, at 6.7 percent, which gives us a clearer picture of exactly what's going on up there.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 730.2 per 100,000 (the highest)
Murder rate: 8.0 per 100,000 (6th highest)
Median household income: $73,355 (3rd highest)
Unemployment rate: 6.7% (the highest)
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1. Louisiana
Well, here we are at number one, and the 'winning' state is Louisiana. We have to admit, we always felt a creepy vibe about all of those swamps and empty plains you see in the movies. We're not totally surprised that there's a fair bit of violence going on in this southern state. The main thing cementing Louisiana in first place is its extremely high murder rate, which is the highest in the country.
For every 100,000 residents in Louisiana, 10.3 people are murdered. That is a ridiculously high number, especially when you think back to New Hampshire's murder rate of 1.1 per 100,000 people at the very beginning of this list. At 5.7 percent, Louisiana has the 3rd highest unemployment rate in the USA, as well as the 7th lowest median household income: $45,727.

Statistics:
Violent crime rate: 539.7 per 100,000 (5th highest)
Murder rate: 10.3 per 100,000 (the highest)
Median household income: $45,727 (7th lowest)
Unemployment rate: 5.7% (3rd highest)

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